living through death

"The only way that you can accept life is if you can accept death.” –Leo Buscaglia

Introduction to Paul Tillich’s Systematic Theology

with one comment

Theology, as a function of the Christian church, must serve the needs of the church. A theological system is supposed to satisfy two basic needs: the statement of the truth of the Christian message and the interpretation of this truth for every new generation. Theology moves back and forth between these two poles, the eternal truth of its foundation and the temporal situation in which the eternal truth must be received. Not many theological systems have been able to balance these two demands perfectly. Most of them either sacrifice elements of the truth or are not able to speak into the situation. Some of them combine both shortcomings. Afraid of missing the eternal truth, they identify it with some previous theological work, with traditional concepts and solutions, and try to impose these on a new, different situation. They confuse eternal truth with a temporal expression of this truth. This is evident in European theological orthodoxy, which in America is known as fundamentalism. When fundamentalism is combined with anti-theological bias, as it is for instance, in its biblicistic-evangelical form, the theological truth of yesterday is defended as an unchangeable message against the theological truth of today and tomorrow. Fundamentalism fails to make contact with the present situation, not because it speaks from beyond every situation, but because it speaks from a situation of the past. It elevates something finite and transitory to infinite and eternal validity. In this respect fundamentalism has demonic traits. It destroys the humble honesty of the search for truth, it splits the conscience of its thoughtful adherents, and it makes them fanatical because they are forced to suppress elements of truth of which they are dimly aware.

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Written by Alex

June 17, 2010 at 1:34 pm

One Response

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  1. Agreed!!! However, I would argue that many in the Charismatic movement surpress past theological truths, not because of careful consideration of these theological positions, but they do so under the name of “present truth”, which emphasizes what God is speaking in the now. This is hazardous due to the lack of theological accountability.

    Jeremy tuholski

    August 4, 2010 at 9:32 pm


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